IDEAL Real Estate, LLC



Posted by IDEAL Real Estate, LLC on 9/23/2018

Becoming a home owner for the first time is an exciting milestone for Millennials! Going from renting an apartment to owning your own property represents a big transition from dependency to independence.

For many people, it even symbolizes making the leap from childhood to adulthood. Once you're a homeowner and a property taxpayer, there's often a newfound feeling of being more established and successful.

While home ownership may bestow upon you a boost in status, the added responsibility of paying for your own repairs, maintenance, and upkeep can take an unexpected toll on your budget. With a little extra planning, however, you can avoid many of the pitfalls of home ownership.

Looking at the Big Picture

Here's a misconception that sometimes creates a financial strain for first-time homeowners: "If we can afford to pay $1800 in rent, every month, then we should be able to afford monthly mortgage payments in that same amount!" While that premise may sound logical, there are a few crucial "missing pieces" from that equation -- pieces which could throw your household budget out of kilter!

In addition to the costs associated with purchasing real estate, such as a down payment and closing costs, there's also the matter of home repairs and property maintenance. Depending on where you decide to live, there could be other fees to absorb, too, including garbage collection, yard waste removal, and water usage. Other expenses that first-time homeowners may overlook include the cost of buying a lawnmower, a snow blower, yard maintenance supplies, tools, and furniture. That's why creating a detailed estimated budget, based on your income, debts, and anticipated expenses can help you determine whether you're truly ready to take the plunge into homeownership.

Enlisting Professional Help

A mortgage broker or bank loan officer can provide you with assistance in calculating your financial readiness for purchasing a home. A good real estate agent can also offer insights and guidance into the process of finding, buying, and owning a house you can comfortably afford. They should be able to provide you with vital information about school taxes, property taxes, average utility bills, homeowner association fees (if any), and any issues revealed in the seller's disclosure form.

One way to avoid -- or at least be prepared for -- costs that often accompany home ownership is to have a qualified property inspector take a close look at the condition of everything in the house from the basement and attic to major appliances and structural features. They can generally tell you whether there are any concerns about mechanical systems, water in the basement, foundation damage, issues with property drainage, the electrical system, potential plumbing problems, and dozens of other vital checkpoints

Whether you're a first-time house hunter or a seasoned homeowner, it pays to understand, anticipate, and budget for the many costs of being a property owner. While owning your own home can be a rewarding and satisfying experience, a guiding principle to keep in mind as you consider available homes on the market is "caveat emptor" (Let the buyer beware)!




Categories: Uncategorized  


Posted by IDEAL Real Estate, LLC on 9/17/2018

This Single-Family in Derry, NH recently sold for $290,000. This style home was sold by - IDEAL Real Estate, LLC.


1 Butternut Lane, Derry, NH 03038

Single-Family

$295,000
Price
$290,000
Sale Price

3
Bedrooms
5
Rooms
2/1
Full/Half Baths
BEAUTIFUL SPLIT LEVEL HOME ON OVER 3 ACRES. Three bedrooms and three baths. Master bedroom has it's own three-quarter bath. Has been in the family for over 31 years. Established neighborhood on Cull-De-Sac. Gorgeous Lot. Road frontage on Butternut is 276.8 feet +/-. House in great shape. Needs some updating. Add your personal touches. Basement is sheet rocked, suspended ceilings, just needs flooring to make into family room, game room or man cave. Half bath already installed. Full of natural light. Derry has great school system. Easy access to Rte 102 or Rte 93. Shopping, Places of Worship, Restaurants galore. Something for everyone. Come visit. It may become your new HOME !






Tags: Real Estate   Single-Family   Derry   03038  
Categories: Sold Homes  


Posted by IDEAL Real Estate, LLC on 9/16/2018

The home selling market can be fierce, regardless of where you live. However, there are lots of things you can do to rise above the house selling competition, and these include:

1. Learn About the Local Housing Market

Take a look at some of the available houses in your city or town Ė you will be glad you did. If you analyze available houses in your area and see how they stack up against your residence, you may find ways to differentiate your home from the competition.

Also, it may be beneficial to assess recently sold houses in your area. If you find out how quickly houses are selling, you can determine if a buyer's or seller's market is in place. Then, you can map out your house selling journey to ensure you can showcase your residence to the right groups of buyers.

2. Perform a Home Inspection

A home inspection is a must if you want to gain a leg up on the house selling competition. If you understand your house's strengths and weaknesses, you can prioritize home repairs. Next, you can take the necessary steps to transform assorted home weaknesses into strengths.

Following a home inspection, review your inspection report. If you have any questions about the report, reach out to the inspector who provided the report. Finally, when you determine how you want to upgrade your house, you can start to complete various home improvement projects.

3. Price Your Home Competitively

If your home is priced competitively, you should have no trouble stirring up interest in your residence as soon as it becomes available.

To establish a competitive price for your house, you may want to conduct a property appraisal. This evaluation enables you to receive a property valuation that you can use to determine the right initial asking price for your residence.

For those who want to streamline the house selling cycle, it may be a good idea to hire a real estate agent, too. This housing market professional can provide you with an immediate competitive advantage over rival home sellers. Best of all, a real estate agent can help you achieve your desired home selling results without delay.

A real estate agent won't take shortcuts, and instead, devotes the necessary time and resources to teach you about the house selling journey. First, he or she will help you establish house selling goals and plan for the property selling journey. A real estate agent next will schedule home showings and open house events that allow buyers to view your residence any time they choose. Furthermore, if you have any home selling questions, a real estate agent can respond to them.

As you prepare to list your home, it helps to do everything possible to obtain a competitive advantage over rival house sellers. Thanks to the aforementioned tips, you can plan ahead for the house selling journey and boost the likelihood of enjoying a successful home selling experience.




Categories: Uncategorized  


Posted by IDEAL Real Estate, LLC on 9/9/2018

Buying is home is a lengthy and, at times, stressful process. So, it can be discouraging when your offer is rejected.

If youíve recently had a purchase offer rejected by the homeowner, donít worry--you have options.

In this post, weíre going to cover some of those options so you can start focusing on your next move and potentially even make a second offer that gets accepted.

1.  Reassess your offer, not the seller

You could spend days guessing the reasons the seller might not have accepted your offer if they didnít give you a straightforward answer.


However, your time is better spent addressing your own offer. Double check the following things:

  • Is your offer significantly lower than the asking price?

  • If so, is it lower than comparable sale prices for homes in the neighborhood?

  • Does your offer contain more than the usual contingencies?

Once youíve reassessed, you can determine if a second offer is appropriate for your situation, or if youíre ready to move onto other prospects with the knowledge youíve gained from this experience in hand.

2. Formulate your second offer

So, youíve decided to make another attempt at the house. Now is the time to discuss details with your spouse and real estate agent.

Out of respect for the sellerís time and their timeline for selling the home, you should treat your second offer as your last.

So, make sure youíre putting your best offer forward. This can mean removing those contingencies mentioned earlier or increasing the amount. However, be realistic about your budget and donít waive contingencies that are necessary (commonly appraisals, inspection, and financing contingencies).

3. Consider including a personal offer letter

In todayís competitive market, many sellers are fielding multiple offers on their home. To set yourself apart from the competitors and to help the seller get to know your goals and reasoning better, a personal letter is often a great tool.

Donít be afraid to give details in your offer letter. Explain what excites you about the house, why it is ideal for your family, and what your plans are for living there.

What shouldnít you include in your offer letter? Avoid statements that try to evoke pity or guilt from the seller. This seldom works and will put-off most buyers to your offer.

4. Moving on is good time management

If you arenít comfortable increasing your offer or if you receive a second rejection, itís typically a good idea to move onto other prospects. It may seem like wasted time--however, just like a job interview that didnít go as planned, itís an excellent learning experience.

Youíll walk away knowing more about the negotiation process, dealing with sellers and agents, and you might even find a home thatís better than the first one in the process!




Categories: Uncategorized  


Posted by IDEAL Real Estate, LLC on 9/2/2018

Owning a second home or vacation home is the dream of many Americans hoping to retire in style. However, owning a second home can also be a huge financial asset and even an added form of income if youíre savvy with the rental process.

What stops most of us from buying a vacation home in our ideal getaway? The funding, of course. But, there are ways to plan ahead to ensure youíll be ready to take the plunge and purchase a second home when the time comes.

In todayís blog post, weíre going to be talking about the steps to buying a home away from home and give you some tip on how to accomplish this goal in the most financially-sensible way possible.

1.  Location is Key

When you buy a second home, you take on all the responsibilities of homeownership a second time. Since you wonít be around every day to tend to maintenance tasks and troubleshoot problems, you risk discovering costly repairs that could otherwise be avoided.

The most common issues to be concerned with are frozen pipes in northern climates, flooding in coastal areas, and problems like pests that can be found just about anywhere.

Depending on your budget, you might want a home you can drive out to on the weekends, meaning somewhere close by to your primary home. This option also makes it easier to stay up-to-date on home maintenance tasks before they become an issue.

2. Try before you buy

If your ideal vacation home is in an area youíre not totally familiar with, itís a good idea to visit the neighborhood, talk to the locals, and gain their perspective on the area before buying.

This trip will also give you a sense of what you can expect to spend each time you visit the home. And, if you plan on renting out the property when you arenít using it, youíll be able to gauge what a reasonable rent price is for the location.

3. Earning income from your vacation home

Making extra cash from a home that you get to use pretty much whenever you want. Sounds like a dream, right? It can be if done properly, but youíll need to ensure a few things before you can start earning income from your vacation property.

First, be aware that investment properties often require a larger down payment (typically 30%). Lenders also charge extra interest on homes that will be rented out.

Finally, there are local and state-level laws youíll need to adhere to. These laws are designed to protect your interests as well as the people who rent out your property, so make sure you use a standard rental agreement for your area.

4. Making an offer

Youíve been here before. Once youíve decided on a home, itís time to start crafting your offer and negotiating with the sellerís agent.

However, before you pick a number, do some research on all of the expenses youíll be paying on the house in question. Property taxes, homeowners association dues, utilities, and any other costs should be on your radar before determining if itís the right home for your budget.

Youíll also want to be aware of the stipulations of renting out a property you own. This includes reporting income from renting your home to the IRS.


Now that you know the steps youíll need to take to move toward your goal of buying a vacation home, youíll be better equipped to make decisions that are best for you and your familyís future.